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Meet the Authors: Octavia's Brood

About the Project

Whenever we envision a world without war, without prisons, without injustice, we are engaging in speculative fiction. Radicals and activists devote their lives to envisioning such worlds, and then go about trying to create them. What better vehicle for them to explore their work and its possibilities than through writing original science fiction stories?

Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown brought together 20 radical writers to do just that. The result is 
Octavia's Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements, an engaging and enlightening collection that uncovers truths buried in the fantastic, and injects a healthy dose of imagination and innovation into our search for truth. It is the first book to explore the connections between radical science fiction and movements for social change, using visionary prose to weave strands of real-life experience—inequality and exploitation, struggle and solidarity—to generate innovative ways of understanding the world around us, paint visions of new worlds that could be, and teach us new ways of interacting with one another. This is visionary fiction to engage our imaginations and guide our hands in struggle.

Many radical minds believe this field was evolved by late science fiction writer Octavia Butler, for whom this collection is named. Butler explored the intersections of identity and imagination – exploring the gray areas of race, class, gender, sexuality, militarism, inequality, oppression, resistance and most importantly, hope.

[Description courtesy of Octavia's Brood]


This project was crowdfunded on Indiegogo, see the initial Indiegogo video below.

Read It at SCC

Praise

“… a vital, visceral, and essential collection.”

Barnes & Noble

“…an intriguing collection… that offers much for anyone concerned about the state of our world."

New York Journal of Books

“This collection, inspired by the writings of Octavia Butler, features almost three dozen stories that exhibit the natural affinity between writing speculative fiction and reflecting on the means of making a better world.”

San Francisco Chronicle

"One part sacred text, one part social movement manual, one part diary of our future selves telling us, 'It's going to be okay, keep working, keep loving.'"

Ruha Benjamin, professor of African American Studies at Princeton University